Sports Injuries

Sprains and Strains

Understanding Joint Pain
Sprained ankles and wrists, arthritic knees and hips and torn rotator cuffs all have one thing in common: They result in joint pain.
Tendonitis
Tendonitis is an inflammation of a tendon—the tough cord of tissue that connects muscles to bones. Tendonitis can affect any tendon, but is most commonly seen in the wrist and fingers.
The Best Ways to Treat, Prevent Tendonitis
Tendonitis is your body's way of telling you, "Enough! You're putting too much stress on this muscle and joint."
Sprains, Strains, Breaks: What’s the Difference?
If you've sprained your ankle, you know what pain is. But maybe that "sprain" was a "strain" or possibly even a "break." The amount of pain in each case can be virtually equal.
Sprained Ankles Need Attention
When you sprain an ankle, one or more ligaments on the outside of your ankle become stretched or torn.

Treating Sports Injuries

Ice Packs vs. Warm Compresses For Pain
It can sometimes be confusing whether to use heat or cold when treating sore muscles or an injury. Here are facts to keep in mind.
When to Use Hot and Cold Therapy
Here's information on how and when to use temperature-related therapies.
Cryotherapy (Cold Therapy) for Pain Management
When used to treat injuries at home, cryotherapy refers to cold therapy with ice or gel packs that are usually kept in the freezer until needed. These remain one of the simplest, time-tested remedies for managing pain and swelling.
Exercise: The Right Program and the Right Preparation
You don't have to exercise for long periods of time—or even vigorously—to become fit. You do need to aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate activity most days of the week.
Sports Injuries: When to Call the Doctor
Sports injuries can be either acute traumatic, which require immediate medical care, or chronic overuse injuries.
Exercise and the Aging Person
Exercise is good for people of all ages. It helps lower blood pressure, reduces the risks for falls and serious injuries, and slows the body's loss of muscle and bone mass.

Preventing Sports Injuries

How to Avoid Sports Injuries
Sports injury rates could be reduced by 25 percent if all athletes — professionals and amateurs — followed essential safety, conditioning, and preventive strategies.
Preventing Sports Injuries
Good preventive steps: Warm up before you work out, alternate days for exercising certain muscle groups, and cool down when you're done.
Sports and Fractures
Stress fractures are weak spots or small cracks in the bone caused by continuous overuse. They often occur in the foot after training for basketball, running, and other sports.
Avoiding Joint Injuries
Common injuries include a twisted ankle, sprained wrist, overextended elbow and damaged knee ligaments. Fortunately, you can take steps to help prevent joint damage.
Dislocations
A dislocation occurs when extreme force is put on a ligament, allowing the ends of two connected bones to separate. Ligaments are flexible bands of fibrous tissue that connect various bones and cartilage.
Treating a Minor Sports Injury
Whether it's a twisted ankle, a shin splint or a strained muscle, when should you see a doctor for a sports injury?
Patellar Tendonitis (Jumper's Knee)
Jumper's knee is also known as patellar tendonitis. It may be caused by overuse of the knee joint, such as frequent jumping on hard surfaces.
Sports Injuries: When to Call the Doctor
Sports injuries can be either acute traumatic, which require immediate medical care, or chronic overuse injuries.
Knees Are Casualties of Women's Sports
Active women are at least twice as likely to suffer serious knee injuries as men, but it's not just athletes who are at risk.
Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (Runner's Knee)
Runner's knee occurs when the kneecap rubs against the thighbone as it moves. The condition can be caused by a structural defect or a certain way of walking or running.
Shin Splints
Shin splints involve damage to one of two groups of muscles along the shin bone that cause pain. The location of the shin splint pain depends on which group of muscles is damaged.
How to Avoid Common Running Injuries
Knowing about common injuries and how to prevent them can keep you on track toward achieving your fitness goals.
You Can Head Off Stress Fractures
A stress fracture occurs when you increase the length or intensity of your workout too quickly.
Dehydration and Heat Stroke
Dehydration and heat stroke are two very common heat-related diseases that can be life threatening if left untreated.
Trampoline Troubles
Trampolines are popular. Thousands of children are rocketing skyward, and trampoline injuries are also on the rise.
Heat-Related Illnesses (Heat Cramps, Heat Exhaustion, Heat Stroke)
Children and teens are at greater risk for heat-related illnesses for several reasons. They adjust more slowly to changes in air temperature. They also produce more heat with activity and sweat less.
Overuse Injuries
Detailed information on overuse injuries in children, including jumper's knee, patellar tendonitis, little leaguers' elbow, little leaguers' shoulder, osteochondritis dissecans, Sever's disease, shin splints, Sinding-Larsen-Johansson disease, spondylolisthesis, and spondylolysis
Lumbar Strain (Weight Lifter's Back)
A lumbar strain is an injury to the lower back, which results in damaged tendons and muscles that spasm and feel sore.
Sports Safety for Children
Because they are still growing, children are more susceptible to sports injuries. Half of those injuries could be prevented with proper safety gear, safer playing environments, and established safety rules.